Quote of the day

As the discussions and debates about the federal budget deficits and long-term debt get underway this summer, I’m sure that many engaged Christians will think carefully about the issues. One typical comment we’ll hear will be something along the lines of “The budget is a moral document,” usually followed by an argument for extending federal welfare spending.

Which leads me to the quote of the day: “It can reasonably be argued that Jesus would not point to the results of five decades of welfarism in America and say, ‘Do more of that.’

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2 Responses to Quote of the day

  1. John Powell says:

    Jesus would look at decades of military spending and say “Don’t do more of that.”
    We cut back welfare big time (too much in my opinion) in the 90’s. I know you’re talking about the”welfare” state in general, but the proposal to privatize Medicare? I will oppose that and other cuts that will move us even further into a country of individualism. The budget is a document that shows our morals and should be approached this way.

  2. Calyn says:

    It seems to me as though Jesus didn’t show that He cared much about how the government was running its business, but He cared ever so much about the formation of His Church and teaching His people to preach good news to the poor, release the prisoner, heal the sick, make reasonable accommodations so that the poor among them could be fed, etc….and the way they pulled this off managed to look a lot better than any state-run welfare system. Maybe we could look at the example of the early church? They seemed to have the right idea in the first few chapters of Acts. I’m just not convinced that trying to write morality into or draw morality from the budget or anything else the government is up to is quite the best way to go about things. Maybe we should just…love? Live justly? Something to that effect?

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